Falstaff Press  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Falstaff Press was a "private" United States publisher of risqué books and anthropologica. Their first publication was Musk, Hashish and Blood in 1900. The publishing house was run by Ben and Anne Rebhuhn. On November 26, 1935, an indictment was filed naming Ben Rebhuhn, Anne Rebhuhn and Ben Raeburn as defendants, a violation of 18 USC § 334, 18 USCA § 334, in that they sent obscene matter through the mails. Louis Shomer was called as a government witness at the May 1939 trial where the three were convicted.

The Anthropological Press was one of their imprints.

Their books blurred where the scholarly ended and the prurient began. Similar publishers included Panurge Press.

Contents

Bibliography

A bibliographical wikification of http://www.wolfshollow.com/Falstaff.html

From BiblioCuriosa

Iwan Bloch, Eugène Duehren, Deniston, Richard, Sex Life in England, Falstaff Press, [1912], 1934.

Jacobus, Louis Jacolliot, Untrodden Fields of Anthropology, Falstaff Press, [1893], [1896], 1937.

Bernhard Stern, The Scented Garden, Falstaff Press, American Ethnological Press, [1903], 1934.

See also

References

External links




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Falstaff Press" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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