Film still  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
 This page Film still is part of the film series.  Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat
Enlarge
This page Film still is part of the film series.
Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat
A film still from the Great Train Robbery, a robber shooting at the projection screen.
Enlarge
A film still from the Great Train Robbery, a robber shooting at the projection screen.

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A film still, sometimes called a publicity still, is a photograph taken on the set of a movie or television program during production, used for promotional purposes. Generally, a still photographer is present on the set, shooting alongside principal photography, but a print could also be made from a frame of a production reel. The latter option is usually less desirable, as the smaller negatives of cine film produce grainier images than do larger stills negatives, and the slow shutter speed used in motion-picture photography (typically 1/48th of a second) produces still images that are more prone to blur.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Film still" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools