Freddy de Vree  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Freddy de Vree (Antwerp, October 3 1939-Antwerp, July 3 2004), pseudonyms Marie-Claire de Jonghe, Conny Couperus and James Klont; was a Belgian poet, literary critic and radiomaker. The past and death play an important role in his oeuvre. He was on friendly terms with W.F. Hermans, Roland Topor and Sylvia Kristel.

Inheriting the artistic microbe from his uncle Paul De Vree, Freddy de Vree made his debut as a writer in 1960 with Skunk (with Tony Rombouts) and more officially in 1961 with the French-language Blues pour Boris Vian. He published his first novel in 1966 (Goudfluit, Eng: Golden flute). Other notable poem anthologies are the 1969 Jaja (E: Yesyes) and De lemen liefde (E: Love of loam), both published under the pseudonym Marie-Claire de Jonghe. He translated Stefan Themerson and Georges Bataille.

His work was posthumously celebrated in the exhibition Antiquaire du surréalisme.

Bibliography

  • A Pollen in the Air (?)
  • Het boek Alfa (?)
  • Le tombeau de Pierre Larousse (?)
  • Orbis militaris (?)
  • Mots pour Karin (1963)
  • Blues pour Boris Vian (1965)
  • De lemen liefde (1969)
  • Jaja (1969)
  • A.C. (1971)
  • Alsof zij niets was (1973)
  • Rita Renoir, enz. (1973)
  • Beleggen en beliegen (1975)
  • Hugo Claus (1976)
  • Pierre Alechinsky (1976)
  • Steden en sentimenten (1976)
  • De dodenklas (1977)
  • Zao Wou-ki (1977)
  • Erfgenamen van de dood (1978)
  • Mexico vandaag (1982)
  • Moravagine of de vervloeking (1982)
  • Karel Appel (1983)
  • Chicago! (1984)
  • Jan Cremer (1984)
  • De God Denkbaar Denkbaar De God (1985)
  • Wyckaert (1986)
  • Drie ogen zo blauw (1987)
  • Jan Vanriet (1996)

Awards

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Freddy de Vree" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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