The history of engraving in France  

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The Miseries and Disasters of War (1633) by Jacques Callot  With the 16th century The Miseries and Disasters of War, French 17th artist Jacques Callot anticipated Goya's Disasters of War, both of them criticizing the horrors of war in their art
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The Miseries and Disasters of War (1633) by Jacques Callot
With the 16th century The Miseries and Disasters of War, French 17th artist Jacques Callot anticipated Goya's Disasters of War, both of them criticizing the horrors of war in their art

"Gustave Dore (1833-1883) must be noted as a most brilliant interpreter of fantastical poetry and legend, decidedly his best creations being imaginative subjects and landscape, such as his illustrations to Dante's Inferno and "Don Quixote" ; also the grotesque but powerful designs for the Legend of the Wandering Jew and Balzac's Contes Drolatiques; while, on the contrary — as in his fairy-tales and Bible illustrations — he becomes almost unbearably vapid, and devoid of style. As for the rest, illustration in France has a humorous and satirical vein — Granville (1813- 1847), Gavarni, properly G. S. Chevallier (1810-1866), Bertall (with La Comedie de notre Temps) Tony Johannot (1803-1852) being its chief piquant and clever contributors, not without a strong leaning toward caricature."--Grundriß der Kunstgeschichte (c. 1860), volume 2 on French caricature by Wilhelm Lübke

Venus at the Opera (1844) by Grandville (French, 1803 – 1847)
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Venus at the Opera (1844) by Grandville (French, 1803 – 1847)
Le Ministère de la Marine (1865-1866) is a print by French etcher Charles Méryon depicting the marine ministry "attacked" by a charging flock of fantastic creatures.
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Le Ministère de la Marine (1865-1866) is a print by French etcher Charles Méryon depicting the marine ministry "attacked" by a charging flock of fantastic creatures.

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Jacques Callot

Jacques Callot

Jacques Callot (c. 1592 - March 28, 1635) was a baroque printmaker, draftsman and caricaturist. He is an important figure in the development of the old master print and major artist of the grotesque. He made over 1,400 brilliantly detailed etchings that chronicled the life of his period, featuring soldiers, clowns, drunkards, gypsies, beggars, as well as court life. He also etched many religious and military images, and many prints featured extensive landscapes in their background. He deeply inspired E. T. A. Hoffmann, who dedicated Fantasy Pieces in Callot's Manner (1814) to him.

Bernard Picart

Bernard Picart

Bernard Picart (1673-1733) was a French engraver, son of Etienne Picart, also an engraver. He was born in Paris and died in Amsterdam. He moved to Antwerp in 1696, and then spent a year in Amsterdam before returning to France at the end of 1698. After his wife died in 1708, he moved to Amsterdam in 1711 (later being joined by his father), where he became a Protestant convert and married again.

Picart, Prosper Marchand and Charles Levier belonged to a "radical Huguenot coterie".

Charles Méryon

Charles Méryon

Charles Méryon (November 23, 1821-February 13, 1868), was a French artist, who worked almost entirely in etching. Although now little-known in the English-speaking world, he is generally recognised as the most significant etcher of 19th century France.

His most famous work is a series of views of Paris.

Timeline

This is a chronological list of French engravers.

Renaissance

17th-century

18th-century

19th-century (Romanticism and Impressionism)

19th-century (Impression and Fauvism)

20th-century (before World War II)

20th-century (post-World War II)

See also

etching, French art, French caricature




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The history of engraving in France" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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