Götterdämmerung  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
  1. The German myth of the destruction of the gods in a final battle with the forces of evil; the apocalypse.
  2. Any cataclysmic downfall or momentous, apocalyptic event, especially of a regime or an institution.

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Götterdämmerung is the last in Richard Wagner's cycle of four operas titled Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung, or The Ring for short). It received its premiere at the Bayreuth Festspielhaus on 17 August 1876, as part of the first complete performance of the Ring.

The title is a translation into German of the Old Norse phrase Ragnarök, which in Norse mythology refers to a prophesied war among various beings and gods that ultimately results in the burning, immersion in water, and renewal of the world. However, as with the rest of the Ring, Wagner's account diverges significantly from his Old Norse sources.

The term Götterdämmerung is occasionally used in English to refer to a disastrous conclusion of events.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Götterdämmerung" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools