Glass  

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This structure, built for the Great Exhibition of 1851, symbolizes the rise of modern architecture by its use of glass and steel.
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This structure, built for the Great Exhibition of 1851, symbolizes the rise of modern architecture by its use of glass and steel.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Glass is an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid material. Glasses are typically brittle and optically transparent.

The most familiar type of glass, used for centuries in windows and drinking vessels. Often, the term glass is used in a restricted sense to refer to this specific use.

Glass, as a substance, plays an essential role in science and industry. Its chemical, physical, and in particular optical properties make it suitable for applications such as flat glass, container glass, optics and optoelectronics material, laboratory equipment, thermal insulator, reinforcement materials, and glass art (art glass, studio glass).

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History

The history of creating glass can be traced back to 3500 BCE in Mesopotamia. The term glass developed in the late Roman Empire. It was in the Roman glassmaking center at Trier, now in modern Germany, that the late-Latin term glesum originated, probably from a Germanic word for a transparent, lustrous substance.

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In art

Buildings

Namesakes




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Glass" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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