Golden age (metaphor)  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Redirected from Golden Age (metaphor))
Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
For the mythological meaning see Golden Age, for other uses see Golden Age (disambiguation)

A golden age is a period in a field of endeavour when great tasks were accomplished. The term originated from early Greek and Roman poets who used to refer to a time when mankind lived in a better time and was pure (see Golden Age).

Contents

Golden Age in society

A society's Golden Age marks that period in its history having a heightened output of art, science, literature, and philosophy.

Culture and technology

A golden age is often ascribed to the years immediately following some technological innovation. It is during this time that writers and artists ply their skills to this new medium. Therefore, there are Golden Ages of both radio and television. During this nascent phase the technology allows new ideas to be expressed, as new art forms flower quickly into new areas:

At least one technology had its "Golden Age" in its latter years:

Genre

Technology and creativity spawn new genres in literature and theatre. The onset of a new genre will be its Golden Age:

Science

Freethought

The Golden Age of Freethought is regarded the era from about the 1870s through the beginning of World War I in which freethought flourished in the United States. Social trends clashed with religious orthodoxy and caused people to question their traditional ideas about the world.

Senior citizen

Companies will use "Golden Age" as a marketing euphemism to replace "senior citizen":

Sport

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Golden age (metaphor)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools