Gothic: Four Hundred Years of Excess, Horror, Evil and Ruin  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Gothic: Four Hundred Years of Excess, Horror, Evil and Ruin (1999: North Port Press) is a book by Richard Davenport-Hines.

It is a voluminous aesthetic history of the Gothic.

From the publisher:

"Beginning with the eruption of Vesuvius in 1631, an event so powerful it created a new landscape and inspired the desolate and savage paintings of Salvator Rosa, Richard Davenport-Hines traces the evolution of the gothic imagination. This revelatory history ranges through art, architecture, gardening, literature, photography, filmmaking, music, and clothing design, and takes in artists and creations as various as Byron, Horace Walpole, Goya, Frankenstein's monster, Edgar Allan Poe, Jackson Pollock, David Lynch, The Terminator, and The Cure."





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Gothic: Four Hundred Years of Excess, Horror, Evil and Ruin" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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