Guy Fawkes mask  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Guy Fawkes mask is a stylised depiction of Guy Fawkes, the best-known member of the Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up the English Palace of Westminster in London in 1605. While the use of a mask on an effigy has long roots as part of Guy Fawkes Night celebrations, a stylised mask designed by illustrator David Lloyd came to represent broader protest after it was used as a major plot element in V for Vendetta, published in 1982, and its 2006 film adaptation. After appearing in internet forums, the mask was worn by participants in real-life protests and has become widespread internationally among groups protesting against politicians, banks and financial institutions, such as the Occupy movement.

The mask portrays a white face with a subtle smile and red cheeks, a wide moustache upturned at both ends, and a thin vertical pointed beard.

In 2011, the protesters' adoption of the mask has led to it becoming the top-selling mask on Amazon.com, selling hundreds of thousands a year. Time Warner, one of the largest media companies in the world, is paid a fee with the sale of each mask, as it owns the rights to the image.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Guy Fawkes mask" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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