Hand-in-waistcoat  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The hand-in-waistcoat was a gesture commonly found in men's portraiture during the 18th and 19th centuries. Napoleon I of France was most well-known for the gesture and is readily associated with this gesture due to the several portraits made by his artist, Jacques-Louis David. Theories state the gesture was done by Napoleon due to a stomach pain he had, but the pose was common in portraits from the mid-1700s. The pose originates from classical times - Aeschines, founder of a rhetoric school suggested that speaking with an arm outside one's toga was rude.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Hand-in-waistcoat" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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