Higher education in the United States  

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"20th-century French philosophy has been very popular in post-war American academia, much like German philosophy has been in French 20th century philosophy." --Sholem Stein


“It is a truism that socialism is dead, and an irony that it survives most robustly as a doctrine not in Paris, where it has suffered a fate worse than falsification by becoming thoroughly unfashionable, nor in London, where it has been abandoned by the Labour Party, but in the universities of capitalist America, as the ideology of the American academic nomenklatura.” --"The End of History, Again?" (1989) by John Gray

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Higher education in the United States refers to a variety of institutions of higher education in the United States. Strong research and funding have helped make American colleges and universities among the world's most prestigious, which is particularly attractive to international students, professors and researchers in the pursuit of academic excellence.

High visibility issues include rising tuition and increasing student loan debt, unfair admissions, greater use of online education, competency-based education, free speech and hate speech, fraternity hazing, campus sexual assault, cutbacks in state and local spending, the adjunctification of academic labor, and student poverty and hunger.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Higher education in the United States" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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