Hugh Glass  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Hugh Glass (c. 1783 – 1833) was an American frontiersman, fur trapper, fur trader, hunter, and explorer. Born in Pennsylvania to Scotch-Irish parents, Glass became an explorer of the watershed of the Upper Missouri River, in present-day Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and the Platte River area of Nebraska. Glass is best known for his story of survival and retribution, after being left for dead by companions, following his mauling by a grizzly bear. Not unlike the experience of his fellow mountain men, Jedediah Smith and Grizzly Adams, he lived to tell the tale of his near death bear attack. The life of Glass has been adapted into two feature-length films: Man in the Wilderness (1971) and The Revenant (2015). The retellings portray Glass, who in the best historical accounts made his way crawling and stumbling Template:Convert to Fort Kiowa, in South Dakota, after being abandoned without supplies or weapons by fellow explorers and fur traders during General Ashley's expedition of 1823.




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