Images of Lust  

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Si ces discours ne satisfont à l'incredulité de vos seigneuries, presentement ... visitez Lusignan, Partenay, Vovant, Mervant, & Ponzauges en Poictou. --Rabelais

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Images of Lust: Sexual Carvings on Medieval Churches (1999) is a book on explicit religious corbels by Anthony Weir and James Jerman.

From the publisher:

From the famous sheela-na-gigs, through all forms of exhibitionists-mermaids, centaurs, misers and priapic figures--extraordinary sculptures considered "obscene" by today's standards may be found on churches in Britain, Ireland, France and Spain. This book examines their origins and purposes and sees them not as sacrilegious figures, or symbols, nor even as idols of ancient pre-Christian religions, but as serious works that dealt with the sexual customs and salvation of medieval folk, and thus gave support to the church's moral teachings.

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