Incorporeality  

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 This page Incorporeality is part of the supernatural series Illustration: Henri Robin and a Specter, 1863 by Eugène Thiébault
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This page Incorporeality is part of the supernatural series
Illustration: Henri Robin and a Specter, 1863 by Eugène Thiébault

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Incorporeal or uncarnate means without the nature of a body or substance. The idea of incorporeality refers to the notion that there is an incorporeal realm of existence, or "place", that is distinct from the corporeal or material universe. Incorporeal beings or objects are not made out of matter in the way a physical, material being or object exists. The idea of the immaterial is often used in reference to The Christian God or the Divine. This being has at times been defined as the Prime Mover or First Cause that exists in an incorporeal or intelligible realm that transcends both space and time, especially in the physical realm. The notion that incorporeality is even possible requires the belief that something can exist or effect the physical, matter or energy, without physically existing at the point of effect. A ball can directly effect another ball by coming in direct contact with it, and is visible because it reflects the light that directly reaches it. An incorporeal object or being could not perform these functions as it has no material construction with which to perform these functions and would thus not be visible or able to affect anything that is of a physical construction.


Many philosophers have referred to the incorporeal idea and methods. Most notable are:

Thought thinking itself can also be considered to be an incorporeal method. Concepts in mathematics have also been considered by some to have an incorporeal nature.

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Antonym




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Incorporeality" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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