Iron Curtain  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The "Iron Curtain" was the symbolic, ideological, and physical boundary dividing Europe into two separate areas from the end of World War II until the end of the Cold War, roughly 1945 to 1991. At both sides of the Iron Curtain, the states developed their own international economic and military alliances, COMECON with the Warsaw Pact on the east side with the USSR as most important member, and the NATO and the European Community on the west side, with the United States.

The Iron Curtain took the shape of border defenses between the countries of Western and Eastern Europe, most notably the Berlin Wall, which served as a longtime symbol of the Iron Curtain altogether.

See also

Post Cold War:

  • European Green Belt, a body of conservationists preserving the former Iron Curtain security zone which has become a wildlife preserve
  • Iron Curtain Trail, a long-distance cycling route within the European Green Belt

Geography:




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Iron Curtain" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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