James Ellroy  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

James Ellroy (born Lee Earle Ellroy; March 4, 1948) is an American novelist and essayist.

Ellroy has become known for a so-called "telegraphic" prose style, whereby he frequently omits connecting words and uses only short, staccato sentences.

For instance:

They sent him to Dallas to kill a nigger pimp named Wendell Durfee. He wasn't sure he could do it. The Casino Operators Council flew him. They supplied first-class fare. They tapped their slush fund. They greased him. They fed him six cold.

Other hallmarks of his work include dense plotting and a relentlessly pessimistic—albeit conservatively moral—worldview.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "James Ellroy" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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