Jim Haynes  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

James Haynes, usually known as Jim Haynes (born November 10, 1933), was a leading figure in the London "underground" and alternative/counter-culture scene of the 1960s. He was involved with the founding of the paper International Times and the London Arts Lab in Drury Lane for experimental and mixed media work.

Jim Haynes was born in Haynesville, Louisiana, US, where he attended university (after spending several years in Venezuela). Through obligatory military service he relocated to Scotland in 1956, went to Edinburgh University and, among other writing and musical activities, helped in the foundation of the Traverse Theatre and the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

In 1966 he relocated to London in the middle of the "swinging 60s" and became heavily involved in the underground cultural scene, co-founding the pivotal alternative paper International Times, known as "I.T.", along with others including Barry Miles and John Hopkins.

In September 1967, Haynes co-founded the Drury Lane Arts Lab space for mixed-media (it closed 15 months later after infighting over finances).

In 1969 in Amsterdam he co-launched Suck newsaper for sexual freedom. It was also obtainable in the UK. The first issue contained a long and unrestrainedly descriptive erotic poem attributed to W. H. Auden and an explicit photo of Germaine Greer.

Haynes then taught Media Studies and Sexual Politics for 30 years at the University of Paris 8.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Jim Haynes" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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