Joseph Kessel  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Joseph Kessel (born on February 10, 1898 in Clara, Entre Ríos, Argentina, died on July 23 1979 in Avernes, Val-d'Oise, France) was a French journalist and novelist, best known for his novel Belle de jour.

He was born in Argentina because of the constant journeys of his father, a Lithuanian doctor of Jewish origin. Joseph Kessel lived the first years of his childhood in Orenburg, Russia, before the family moved to France. He studied in Nice and Paris, and took part in the First World War as an aviator.

Kessel wrote several novels and books that were later represented in the cinema, such as Belle de jour (by Luis Buñuel in 1967). He was also a member of the Académie française from 1962 to 1979. In 1943 he and Maurice Druon translated Anna Marly's song Chant des Partisans into French from its original Russian. The song became one of the anthems of the Free French Forces.

Joseph Kessel is buried in the Cimetière de Montparnasse in Paris.

Bibliography includes




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Joseph Kessel" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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