Lettres à Sophie  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Lettres à Sophie, is a collection of love letters by Comte de Mirabeau first published in 1792. They were originally published as "Lettres originales de Mirabeau écrites au donjon de Vincennes pendant les années 1777, 78, 79 et 80".

"Sophie" was Marie Thérèse de Monnier; they had fallen in love despite that she was engaged to his colonel. This led to such scandal that his father obtained a lettre de cachet, and Mirabeau was imprisoned in the Ile de Ré. He escaped to Switzerland, where Sophie joined him; they then went to Rotterdam, where he lived by hack work; meanwhile Mirabeau had been condemned to death at Pontarlier for seduction and abduction, and in May 1777 he was seized by the French police, and imprisoned by a lettre de cachet in the castle of Vincennes.

The early part of his confinement is marked by his letters to Sophie.

French description

Les Lettres à Sophie sont un recueil de la correspondance entretenue entre Mirabeau, alors en captivité au donjon de Vincennes, et Marie Thérèse Sophie Richard de Ruffey. Cette correspondance, où Jean-Charles-Pierre Lenoir, lieutenant général de la police de Paris, joue un grand rôle, furent publiée après 1789 par Pierre Louis Manuel, ancien administrateur du comte de Mirabeau.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Lettres à Sophie" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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