Manny Farber  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Manny Farber (1917, Douglas, Arizona, United States -August 17, 2008) was an American painter and early nobrow film critic, best-known for his his essay "White Elephant Art vs. Termite Art".

He taught at the University of California San Diego alongside Raymond Durgnat, Jean-Pierre Gorin and Jonathan Rosenbaum.

He was an early advocate of such filmmakers as Howard Hawks, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, William Wellman, Raoul Walsh, Anthony Mann, Michael Snow, Chantal Akerman, George Kuchar and Andy Warhol.

His 1957 essay "Underground films: a bit of male truth" coined the term underground film.

In his essay "White Elephant Art vs. Termite Art" originally published in 1962, he eloquently championed B film and under-appreciated auteurs and coined several terms, such as termite art and monsterpieces.

Awards

  • 1999 - Special Award at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards
  • 2003 - Mel Novikoff Award at the San Francisco International Film Festival

Writing

  • 1971 - Negative Space: Manny Farber on the Movies
  • 1985 - Manny Farber: The Museum of Contemporary Art
  • 1993 - About Looking, Manny Farber Paintings 1984-1993
  • 2003 - Two for the Road: Sketchbooks of Patricia Patterson and Manny Farber
  • 2003 - About Face

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Manny Farber" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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