Marc Allégret  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Marc Allégret (December 22, 1900 - November 3, 1973) was a French screenwriter and film director.

Born in Basel, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland, he was the elder brother of Yves Allégret. Marc was educated to be a lawyer. Allégret became André Gide's lover when he was fifteen and Gide was forty-seven. Later, Marc was to fall briefly under the spell of Cocteau, who Gide feared would "corrupt" him.

Marc's father, Elie Allégret, had originally been hired by Gide's mother to tutor her son in light of his weak grades in school, after which he and his charge became fast friends. In 1895 Elie was best man at Gide's wedding.

After filming a 1927 trip to the Congo with André Gide, he chose to pursue a career in the motion picture industry. His relationship with Gide ended after that trip, as Allégret found out that he preferred women after experiencing with female natives. They nevertheless remained close friends to the end. After working and training as an assistant director, in 1931 he directed his first feature Mam'zelle Nitouche and the following year received much acclaim for his film, Fanny. He went on to a long career during which he wrote numerous scripts and directed more than fifty films.

Allégret is noted for discovering and/or developing new acting talent who went on to stardom including Michèle Morgan, Raimu, Gérard Philipe, Danièle Delorme, Louis Jourdan, and Roger Vadim who would become his directing assistant.

He died in 1973 and was interred in the Cimetière des Gonards in Versailles, France.

Filmography

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Marc Allégret" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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