Mars and Venus Caught in the Net  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Venus and Mars

Mars and Venus Caught in the Net by Marten Jacobszoon Heemskerk van Veen

"In the Odyssey (8:269), and in Ovid's Metamorphoses, when Helios tells Hephaestus of Aphrodite's and Ares' coupling, Hephaestus devises a trap to capture them and display them in the act of lovemaking. He entangles them in an invisible net, and then exposes them to the laughter of the gods. Unfortunately, although he reveals his cleverness in the process, he also exposes himself as the cuckold, attempting unsuccessfully to retain the love and devotion of his wife. All too frequently, Hephaestus is the target of the gods' laughter."[1]




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