Marsilio Ficino  

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""The famous dictum "Deus est sphaera intelligibilis cuius centrum ubique circumferentia musquam" which probably goes back to Alain de Lille, seems to have been the intermediary as well as the most important formulation of all these concepts. The successors of Alain were indeed illustrious: The successors of Alain were indeed illustrious : Bonaventura, Thomas Aquinas, Meister Eckhart and Seuse, Cusanus, Marsilio Ficino; and finally Rabelais and Pascal."" --Symbolism of the Sphere (1977) by Otto Brendel

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Marsilio Ficino (Latin name: Marsilius Ficinus; Figline Valdarno, October 19 1433 - Careggi, October 1 1499) was one of the most influential humanist philosophers of the early Italian Renaissance, an astrologer, a reviver of Neoplatonism who was in touch with every major academic thinker and writer of his day, and the first translator of Plato's complete extant works into Latin. His Florentine Academy, an attempt to revive Plato's school, had enormous influence on the direction and tenor of the Italian Renaissance and the development of European philosophy.

Giovanni Cavalcanti

Ficino practiced love metaphysic with Giovanni Cavalcanti whom he made the principal character in his commentary on the Convivio, and to whom he wrote ardent love letters in Latin which were published in his Epistulae in 1492. Apart from these letters there are numerous indications that Ficino's erotic impulses were directed towards men. After his death his biographers had a difficult task trying to refute those who spoke of his homosexual tendencies. However his sincere and deep faith, and membership of the Catholic clergy, put him outside the reach of gossip and suspicions of sodomy.



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