Metapainting  

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"The term metafiction appears to have been coined in English by William H. Gass in his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction” while the term metapainting appeared in English perhaps for the first time in the 1978 essay "Levels of Reality in Literature" by Italo Calvino." --Sholem Stein

 This page Metapainting is part of the meta series. Illustration: Reverse Side of a Painting (1670) by Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrechts, an example of metapainting.
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This page Metapainting is part of the meta series.
Illustration: Reverse Side of a Painting (1670) by Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrechts, an example of metapainting.
Ancient Rome (1757) by Giovanni Paolo Panini, a real painting depicting imaginary paintings of actual Roman antiquities.
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Ancient Rome (1757) by Giovanni Paolo Panini, a real painting depicting imaginary paintings of actual Roman antiquities.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The term metapainting refers to paintings that reflect on the nature of paintings, paintings on painting as it were.

To this category belong such paintings as Reverse Side of a Painting (1670), Las Meninas (1656) by Diego Velázquez and Magritte's The Treachery Of Images (1928-29).

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Metapainting" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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