Mikhail Lermontov  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov (October 15 1814 - July 27 1841), a Russian Romantic writer and poet, sometimes called "the poet of the Caucasus", was the most important presence in Russian poetry after Alexander Pushkin's death until his own four years later, at the age of 26. Like Pushkin, he fell in a duel. In one of his best-known poems, written on January 1, 1840 he described his poetry as "iron verse steeped in bitterness and hatred."




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Mikhail Lermontov" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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