Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe  

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Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe by Eugène Bataille, page from Le Rire by Coquelin cadet
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Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe by Eugène Bataille, page from Le Rire by Coquelin cadet
This page Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe is part of the laughter series.Illustration: Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe by Eugène Bataille
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This page Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe is part of the laughter series.
Illustration: Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe by Eugène Bataille

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe[1][2] (French: Mona Lisa fumant la pipe) is an 'augmented' Mona Lisa by Arthur Sapeck (Eugène Bataille), first published as an illustration in Coquelin cadet's book Le Rire in 1887, accompanied by the text:

"Voici un tableau de maître représentant une femme d’une beauté éclatante. Supposez, un instant, que, par hasard, le maître ait laissé dans la bouche de cette femme idéale, une, pipe culottée. — Vous riez. Voilà pour les yeux."[3]

English:

"This is a masterpiece depicting a woman of striking beauty. Imagine for a moment that, by chance, the master has left in the mouth of this ideal beauty, a cheeky pipe -.. You laugh. For the eyes. "

The work directly prefigures the famous Marcel Duchamp image L.H.O.O.Q. of 1919.

The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines erroneously states that it was first shown in 1883 at the second "Incohérents" exhibition.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Mona Lisa Smoking a Pipe" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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