Monkey  

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As "Darwinism" became widely accepted in the 1870s, good-natured caricatures of him with an ape or monkey body symbolised evolution.
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As "Darwinism" became widely accepted in the 1870s, good-natured caricatures of him with an ape or monkey body symbolised evolution.
Chimpanzee Typing (1907) - New York Zoological Society
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Chimpanzee Typing (1907) - New York Zoological Society

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Any of several ape-like primates, generally smaller than the apes, and distinguished from them by having a tail and cheek pouches. Metaphorically, a mischievous child.

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Monkeys in art

Monkeys have been a favourite subject in art through the ages: paintings by Gabriel von Max, Joseph Schippers, Chardin, Alexandre Gabriel Decamps and Edwin Landseer; the photography of Jill Greenberg and the sculpture of Emmanuel Frémiet are some examples. And at the low art end of the spectrum, there is King Kong.

Singerie

singerie

Singerie is the French word for "Monkey Trick". It is a genre depicting monkeys apeing human behavior, often fashionably attired, intended as a diverting sight, always with a gentle cast of mild satire. It revived with the French decorator and designer Jean Berain the Elder, who included dressed figures of monkeys in a lot of his wall decorations, and the great royal ébéniste André-Charles Boulle.

More examples

References

See also

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Monkey" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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