Music of Morocco  

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In 1968, Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones recorded the Master Musicians of Jajouka in the village of Jajouka in northern Morocco. Jones died the following year but the LP was released in 1971 on Rolling Stones Records. Although there was some criticism of the electronic treatments Jones applied to the recordings in post-production, the LP was one of the first recordings released in the pop market that showcased traditional Moroccan music.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Moroccan music is characterized by its great diversity from one region to another. It includes Arabic music as the chaâbi and the aita of the Atlantic plains (Doukkala-Abda, Chaouia-Ouardigha, Rehamna ...), the melhoune of the Andalusian cities (Meknes, Fes, Salé, Tetouan, Oujda...) as well as the Hassani in the Moroccan Sahara. There is also Amazigh music such as the Rif reggada, the ahidus of the Middle Atlas and the Souss ahwash. In addition, young people synthesize the Moroccan spirit with influences from around the world (blues, rock, metal, reggae, Moroccan rap, etc.). Each genre and musical group is made up of regional subgroups, and is further divided between 'modern' and 'traditional' music.

Among the most popular traditional Moroccan artists internationally are the Master Musicians of Jajouka, an all-male guild trained from childhood, and Hassan Hakmoun, a master of gnāwa trance music, a popular spiritual style that traces its roots to sub-Saharan Africa. Younger Moroccans enjoy raï, a style of plain-speaking Algerian music that incorporates traditional sounds with those of Western rock, Jamaican reggae, and Egyptian and Moroccan popular music.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Music of Morocco" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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