Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg (Museum of Fine Arts of Strasbourg) is the old masters paintings collection of the city of Strasbourg, located in the Alsace region of France. The museum is housed in the first and second floors of the baroque Palais Rohan since 1898. The museum displays works by non-Upper Rhenish painters from the 14th century until 1871 and by Upper Rhenish artist from between 1681 and 1871. The museum owns 850 works (as of 2006), of which 250 are on permanent display. The old masters from the upper-Rhenish area are exhibited in the neighboring Musée de l’Œuvre Notre-Dame.

Contents

Painters exhibited (selected)

Italian

Giotto di Bondone
Sano di Pietro
Sandro Botticelli
Carlo Crivelli
Piero di Cosimo
Cima da Conegliano
Raphael
Correggio
Veronese
Tintoretto
Guercino
Canaletto
Salvator Rosa
Alessandro Magnasco
Giuseppe Maria Crespi

Flemish and Dutch

Hans Memling
Gerard David
Maarten van Heemskerck
Peter Paul Rubens
Jacob Jordaens
Salomon van Ruysdael
Pieter de Hooch
Anthony van Dyck
Willem Kalf
Pieter Claesz

Spanish

El Greco
Jusepe de Ribera
Francisco de Zurbarán
Francisco de Goya

French

Philippe de Champaigne
Claude Lorrain
Nicolas de Largillière
François Boucher
Simon Vouet
Antoine Watteau
Philip James de Loutherbourg
Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot
Théodore Chassériau
Gustave Courbet
Théodore Rousseau




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