New Left Review  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The New Left Review is a political journal, founded in 1960 in the UK after the editors of the New Reasoner and the Universities and Left Review merged their boards. The Universities and Left Review had grown out of the Suez crisis in 1956; their journal centred on a rejection of the dominant 'revisionist' orthodoxy within the Labour Party, from a Marxist perspective.

Together they would be at the forefront of the New Left in Britain, with the New Left Review as their theoretical journal. Through the journal, the members of the New Left would create 'New Left Clubs', and began working towards the reestablishment of Socialism as a viable force in English working-class politics.

The journal was initially edited by Stuart Hall, but he was replaced in 1962 by Perry Anderson, who in his first period as editor expanded the focus to debates within Western Marxism. Robin Blackburn took over from Anderson in 1982, and continued in this role until a redesign and relaunch in 2000. Perry Anderson became the editor again.

In its new form, NLR has led with major articles on the United States, China, Japan, Europe, Britain, Indonesia, Cuba, Iraq, Mexico, India and Palestine. It has featured major analyses of the global economy, the post-Seattle anti-corporate globalization activism, discussions of world literature and cinema, cultural criticism and the avant-garde.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "New Left Review" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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