Ode to Fear  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"Ode to Fear" is a 1746 poem by William Collins in which he glorifies fear as though it were the better part of imagination. It can be regarded as a piece of Gothic theory.

O thou whose spirit most possessed,

The sacred seat of Shakespeare’s breast!

By all that from thy prophet broke

In thy divine emotions spoke:

Hither again thy fury deal,

Teach me but once, like him, to feel;

His cypress wreath my meed decree,

And I, O Fear, will dwell with thee!



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Ode to Fear" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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