Official culture  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
The Great Sphinx of Giza (photo by Maxime Du Camp), 1849 (a public statue is by its nature 'official art')
Enlarge
The Great Sphinx of Giza (photo by Maxime Du Camp), 1849 (a public statue is by its nature 'official art')
The Death of Marat (1793) by Jacques-Louis David (who was the offical artist of France after the Revolution)  "All efforts to render politics aesthetic culminate in one thing: war" --Walter Benjamin
Enlarge
The Death of Marat (1793) by Jacques-Louis David (who was the offical artist of France after the Revolution)
"All efforts to render politics aesthetic culminate in one thing: war" --Walter Benjamin
Nazi Germany disapproved of contemporary German art movements such as Expressionism and Dada and on July 19, 1937 it opened the Degenerate art travelling exhibition in the Haus der Kunst in Munich, consisting of modernist artworks chaotically hung and accompanied by text labels  deriding the art, to inflame public opinion against modernity.
Enlarge
Nazi Germany disapproved of contemporary German art movements such as Expressionism and Dada and on July 19, 1937 it opened the Degenerate art travelling exhibition in the Haus der Kunst in Munich, consisting of modernist artworks chaotically hung and accompanied by text labels deriding the art, to inflame public opinion against modernity.

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Official culture is the culture that receives social legitimation or institutional support in a given society. Official culture is usually identified with bourgeois culture. For revolutionary Guy Debord, official culture is a "rigged game" ("le jeu truqué de la culture officielle") , where conservative powers forbid subversive ideas to have direct access to the public discourse, and where such ideas are integrated only after being trivialized and sterilized. ("Report on the Construction of Situations")

A widespread observation is that a great talent has a free spirit. For instance Alexander Pushkin, which some scholars regard as Russia's first great writer, attracted the mad irritation of the Russian officialdom and particularly of the Tsar, since he

"instead of being a good servant of the state in the rank and file of the administration and extolling conventional virtues in his vocational writings (if write he must), composed extremely arrogant and extremely independent and extremely wicked verse in which a dangerous freedom of thought was evident in the novelty of his versification, in the audacity of his sensual fancy, and in his propensity for making fun of major and minor tyrants." --Vladimir Nabokov (1981) Lectures on Russian Literature, lecture on Russian Writers, Censors, and Readers, pp.13-4

Contents

Official art

Official art includes public art and monuments.

Art patronage

patronage

In European art, patrons have been the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages; the courts in the Renaissance and the bourgeoisie (the new middle class) in the Enlightenment era. During the 20th century private patrons were joined by state funded arts councils and museums.

Example: French revolution

art and the French Revolution

Jacques-Louis David effectively became a 'dictator of the arts' under the French Republic and in the subsequent reign of Napoleon.

Official music

National anthem

Unofficial culture: satire and the like

Satire, caricature, graffiti, guerilla art and street art are art forms that are in opposition of official culture, in other words anti-establishment.

See also

Antonyms




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Official culture" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools