One is not criminal for painting the strange tendencies inspired by nature  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
"On est point criminel pour faire la peinture
des bizarres penchants qu'inspire la nature"[1]

is a dictum by Marquis de Sade.

It is translated in English as "One is not criminal for painting the strange tendencies inspired by nature"). It is the epigraph to the final edition of Justine.

It supposedly is an adaptation of the verse by Petronius's Satyricon:

"Quid me constricta spectatis fronte Catone,
damnatisque novae simplicitatis opus?
Sermonis puri non tristis gratia ridet,
quodque facit populus, candida lingua refert."

--(Petronio, Satyricon, CXXXII, 15)

“Why do ye, Cato's disciples, look at me with wrinkled foreheads, and condemn a work of fresh simplicity? A cheerful kindness laughs through my pure speech, and my clean mouth reports whatever the people do. All men born know of mating and the joys of love; all men are free to let their limbs glow in a warm bed. Epicurus, the true father of truth, bade wise men be lovers, and said that therein lay the crown of life.”

--(Loeb translation by M.Heseltine)[...]

Dutch translation

"Je kan bezwaarlijk als crimineel bestempeld worden voor het beschrijven van de bizarre neigingen van de natuur."

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "One is not criminal for painting the strange tendencies inspired by nature" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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