Passage  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

"I have to admit that the Passage was an unbelievable pesthole. It was made to kill you off, slowly but surely, what with the little mongrels' urine, the shit, the sputum, the leaky gas pipes. The stink was worse than the inside of a prison." --Death on Credit (1936) by Louis-Ferdinand Céline tr. Ralph Manheim


"From 1786 to 1935, during the "l’Ère des passages couverts" (the Arcade Era), arcades soon spread across Europe, North America and the Antipodes. Examples of these grand shopping arcades include: Palais Royal in Paris (opened in 1784); Passage de Feydeau in Paris (opened in 1791); London's Piccadilly Arcade (1810) and Milan's Galleria Vittorio Emanuele (1878). Other notable nineteenth century grand arcades include the Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert in Brussels which was inaugurated in 1847 and Istanbul's Çiçek Pasajı opened in 1870. Shopping arcades were the precursor to the modern shopping mall, and the word "arcade" is now often used for malls which do not use the architectural form at all. These arcades were the subject of Walter Benjamin's incomplete magnum-opus Arcades Project."--Sholem Stein

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
Enlarge
Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
  1. A paragraph or section of text or music with particular meaning.
    passage of scripture
    She struggled to play the difficult passages.
  2. Part of a path or journey.
    He made his passage through the trees carefully, mindful of the stickers.
  3. An artistic term describing use of tight brushwork to link objects in separate spatial plains. Commonly seen in Cubist works.

See also

Etymology

From Old French, from passer +‎ -age.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Passage" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools