Place  

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The Map of Tendre (Carte du Tendre) is a French map of an imaginary country called Tendre. It shows a geography entirely based around the theme of love
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The Map of Tendre (Carte du Tendre) is a French map of an imaginary country called Tendre. It shows a geography entirely based around the theme of love
Bird's Nest and Ferns (1863) by Fidelia Bridges
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Bird's Nest and Ferns (1863) by Fidelia Bridges

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Place is a term that has a variety of meanings in a dictionary sense, but which is principally used in a geographic sense as a noun to denote location, though in a sense of a location identified with that which is located there. For instance, much has been written about the "sense of place", a well-known phenomenon in human society in which people strongly identify with a particular geographical area or location. Place identity concerns significance and meanings that particular places have for their inhabitants and users. Another instance of its use is as an identifier of a location that is noted for a particular characteristic, such as Stonehenge defining its location as a unique place.

Etymology

From Middle English place, from Old English plæse, plætse, plæċe (“place, an open space, street”), from Latin platea (“plaza, wide street”), from Ancient Greek πλατεῖα (plateîa), shortening of πλατεῖα (plateîa) ὁδός (hodós, “broad way”), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (“to spread”), extended form of *pelh- (“flat”), *pelh₂-. Reinforced in Middle English by Old French place (“open space”). Displaced native Middle English lough, loogh, loȝ (“place, stead”) (from Old English lōh (“place, stead”)), Middle English stede (“place, location”) (from Old English stede (“place, stead”)), Middle English stowe (“place”) (from Old English stōw (“place, locality, site”)).

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Place" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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