Post-irony  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Post-irony (from the Latin, post- "after", and Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία eirōneía, meaning dissimulation or feigned ignorance) is a term used to connote a state in which earnest and ironic intents become muddled, or less commonly, a return from irony to earnestness, similar to New Sincerity.

Examples of post-ironic artwork include South African band Die Antwoord and the Werner Herzog film Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans. Noted anti-humor comedian Tim Heidecker portrays a man living a post-ironic lifestyle in The Comedy.

This term has become increasingly popular, and has some detractors:

...there are a number of misconceptions about irony that are peculiar to recent times....the eighth is that "post-ironic" is an acceptable term - it is very modish to use this, as if to suggest one of three things: i) that irony has ended; ii) that postmodernism and irony are interchangeable, and can be conflated into one handy word; or iii) that we are more ironic than we used to be, and therefore need to add a prefix suggesting even greater ironic distance than irony on its own can supply. None of these things is true.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Post-irony" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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