Psychoactive cacti  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Many cacti are known to be psychoactive, but the two main ritualistic (folkloric) genera of psychoactive cacti are Echinopsis (syn. Trichocereus), of which the most psychoactive species is the San Pedro cactus (Echinopsis pachanoi, syn. Trichocereus pachanoi), and Lophophora, of which the most psychoactive species is peyote (Lophophora williamsii). Albeit, there are several other species pertaining to other Genera which are also psychoactive, but not always used with a ritualistic intent.

Ethnic Use

Several world regions have historically used psychoactive cacti for their properties, particularly Indigenous peoples from Central and South America, such as in Mexico and the Andes region. For this purpose (which includes commercial harvesting) cacti plants are specifically grown in the millions.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Psychoactive cacti" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools