Punky Reggae Party  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"Punky Reggae Party" is a song by reggae legend Bob Marley recorded in 1977, while Marley was in exile in London. Not appearing on any studio album, it was released as the b-side to the Jamming single in some countries and was later released as a live single on Babylon By Bus, both on Island Records. Subsequently, it appeared on a number of compilations and 'Best of' albums as well as the Deluxe Edition of Exodus.

Punk and reggae

Bob was introduced to punk bands, such as the Clash while in London. Inspired by punk's efforts to expose various oppressive tactics used against racial minority groups, Marley recorded Punky Reggae Party with producer Lee Perry at the helm.

Notes

"Punky Reggae Party" is a song by reggae legend Bob Marley and was recorded in 1977. The song was written during Marley's exile in England, where he was exposed to the punk scene in its early stages. Finding a kindred spirit in the punk movement Marley identified with the punks' struggle against the government in England. Heavily influenced by bands such as The Clash Marley recorded this song. It appears on a number of compliations and 'Best of' albums. Originally it was released on the LP Exodus and was later released as a live single on Babylon By Bus.


"Bob Marley was never really connected to the punk scene because he had his own thing going on. He didn't disrespect punk, but he really had a different position. He respected the African-American youth of England, and more importantly, the black youth of Jamaica. There were parallels between the two movements Rastas were like Jamaican Punks. They were totally against the "system" in Jamaica in the same way that the punks were in England." [1]

"Reggae was very much identified with Rastafarians. Rastas were regarded as the dregs-the untouchables-the same as punks were. At first Bob Marley was down on punks calling them unclean. After seeing the many parallels between punk and reggae (both protested the inequities and injustices of the society and the system) he came to the conclusion, "See all those people with a safety-pin stuck through their ears? I like to see a man who can suffer pain without crying." That's when he came round and recorded the single 'Punky Reggae Party' to sum up the connection."[2]

The song was inspired by Don Letts' dub reggae DJ sets at the Roxy club in Covent Garden in the late 1970s in between sets by such bands as The Clash, Generation X and The Slits. The song was referred to in Sublime's song "Garden Grove".

"While in exile in London, Bob was introduced to punk bands, such as the Clash. Inspired by their efforts to expose various oppressive tactics used against racial minority groups, the fusion between punk and reggae was imminent. The result was the recording of 'Punky Reggae Party' with producer Lee Perry at the helm." [3]





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Punky Reggae Party" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Punky Reggae Party" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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