Quince  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

The quince (Template:IPAc-en; Cydonia oblonga) is the sole member of the genus Cydonia in the family Rosaceae (which also contains apples and pears, among other fruits). It is a deciduous tree that bears a pome fruit, similar in appearance to a pear, and bright golden-yellow when mature. Throughout history the cooked fruit has been used as food, but the tree is also grown for its attractive pale pink blossoms and other ornamental qualities.

Ornamental

Quince is one of the most popular species for deciduous bonsai specimens, along with related Chinese quince and Japanese quince, native to Eastern Asia.

Cultural associations

  • In Turkey, the expression ayvayı yemek (literally "to eat the quince") is used as a derogatory term indicating any unpleasant situation or a malevolent incident to avoid. This usage is likened to the rather bitter aftertaste of a quince fruit inside the mouth.
  • When a baby is born in the Balkans, a quince tree is planted as a symbol of fertility, love and life.
  • Ancient Greek poets (Ibycus, Aristophanes, e.g.) used quinces (kydonia) as a mildly ribald term for teenage breasts.
  • Although the Book of Genesis does not name the specific type of the fruit that Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the Garden of Eden, some ancient texts suggest Eve's fruit of temptation might have been a quince.
  • In Plutarch's Lives, Solon is said to have decreed that "bride and bridegroom shall be shut into a chamber, and eat a quince together."
  • In the famous children's poem, "The Owl and the Pussycat" by Edward Lear (1871), "they dined on mince and slices of quince ..."
  • Referenced in the movie, White men can't jump as one of 5 foods that start with the letter Q and as the supposed forbidden fruit from the Biblical Garden of Eden.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Quince" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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