Realistic Manifesto  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Redirected from Realist Manifesto)
Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Realistic Manifesto, is a key text of Constructivism written by sculptor Naum Gabo and cosigned by his brother Antoine Pevsner. The manifesto laid out their theories about artistic expression. The Manifesto focused largely on divorcing art from such conventions as use of lines, colour, volume, and mass. They also believed art should accompany man through all parts of his life: "at the workbench, at the office, at work, at rest, and at leisure; work days and holidays, at home and on the road, so that the flame of life does not go out in man."




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Realistic Manifesto" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools