Rip, Rig and Panic (album)  

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Rip, Rig and Panic is a 1965 jazz album by saxophonist Roland Kirk. It was recorded at Rudy Van Gelder's studio by a quartet that sees Kirk accompanied by Elvin Jones (drums), Jaki Byard (piano), and Richard Davis (bass), who have been described as "the most awesome rhythm section he ever recorded with". The group works through a set made up primarily of original Kirk compositions. Kirk made a lot of references to pioneers of Jazz. „No Tonic Press“ is a reference to Lester Young, „From Bechet, Byas, And Fats“ is a hommage to Sidney Bechet, Don Byas, and Fats Waller, and „Once In A While“ was inspired by Clifford Brown. Kirk also mentioned the work of Edgar Varese, the compositions Poeme electronique and Ionisation, an stimulation for the album.

The title of the album was explained by Kirk in the liner notes as follows: “Rip means Rip Van Winkle (or Rest in Peace?); it´s the way people, even musicians are. They´re asleep. Rig means like rigor mortis. That´s where a lot of peoples mind are. When they hear me doing things they didn´t think I could do they panic in their minds,”

The LP's title later provided the name for 1980s English funk group Rip Rig & Panic (with Neneh Cherry).

The album was well received by the jazz critics. Richard Cook and Brian Morton rated the Emarcy-edition of the album with the second highest grade in their Penguin Guide to Jazz; Allmusic rated the album with five stars.

Track listing

Tracks written by Kirk, except where noted
  1. "No Tonic Pres" – 4:34
  2. "Once in a While" (Michael Edwards, Bud Green) – 4:02
  3. "From Bechet, Byas, and Fats" – 6:31
  4. "Mystical Dream" – 2:39
  5. "Rip, Rig & Panic" – 7:00
  6. "Black Diamond" (Milt Sealey) – 5:23
  7. "Slippery, Hippery, Flippery" – 4:56





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Rip, Rig and Panic (album)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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