Roman Rite  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The liturgical rite used in the Diocese of Rome is called the Roman Rite. It is by far the most widespread of the Latin liturgical rites used within the Western or Latin autonomous particular Church, the particular Church that is also called the Latin Rite. Like virtually all other liturgical rites within Christianity, the Roman Rite has grown and been adapted over the centuries. The development of its Eucharistic liturgy can be divided into three stages: Pre-Tridentine, Tridentine, and the Post-Tridentine.

With his 2007 motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI approved the continued use of the form in the 1962 Roman Missal, within certain limits in the case of Mass celebrated with the people, as an extraordinary form of the Roman Rite.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Roman Rite" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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