Sadness  

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Frontispiece for the 1638 edition of The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton
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Frontispiece for the 1638 edition of The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton
L'Absinthe (1876) by Edgar Degas
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L'Absinthe (1876) by Edgar Degas
La Fleur du marécage (1885) by Odilon Redon
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La Fleur du marécage (1885) by Odilon Redon

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Sadness is an emotion characterized by feelings of disadvantage, loss, and helplessness. When sad, people often become quiet, less energetic, and withdrawn. Sadness is considered to be the opposite of happiness, and is similar to the emotions of sorrow, grief, misery, and melancholy. The philosopher Baruch Spinoza defined sadness as the “transfer of a person from a large perfection to a smaller one.”

Sadness can be viewed as a temporary lowering of mood (feeling blue), whereas clinical depression is characterized by a persistent and intense lowered mood, as well as disruption to one's ability to function in day to day matters.

Etymology

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (“sated with, weary of, satiated, filled, full”), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (“sated, satisfied”), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (“to satiate, satisfy”). Cognate with West Frisian sêd, Dutch zat (“sated, drunk”), German satt (“well-fed, full”), Danish sat, Norwegian sad, Gothic (saþs, “full, satisfied”), and through Indo-European, with Latin satur (“well-fed, sated”). Related to sate.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Sadness" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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