Saturday Review (US magazine)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Saturday Review (1924–1986) was a weekly U.S.-based magazine. Originally known as The Saturday Review of Literature (until 1952), it was established by Henry Seidel Canby from the New York Post's weekly books supplement.

The magazine was purchased by the McCall Corporation in 1961. In 1971, the Saturday Review began its decline due to unsteady ownership, as it was sold to a group led by the two co-founders of Psychology Today, which they had recently sold to Boise Cascade. They attempted to split the magazine into four separate monthlies, but the experiment ended in insolvency. Norman Cousins, the former owner, purchased back the magazine and recombined the units with World, a new magazine he had started in his time away from the Review. The magazine was sold to a group led by Carll Tucker in 1977, who in turn sold it to Macro Communications, the owner of the business magazine Financial World, in 1980. It again became insolvent in 1982, and was sold to Missouri entrepreneur Jeffrey Gluck. It was sold to a group of investors in 1984. Publication ended in 1986. Penthouse publisher Bob Guccione acquired the right to the magazine in 1987. He used the title briefly for an online publication on AOL in the early 1990s. Guccione still owns the rights to the title, which remains inactive.

For much of its later existence it was edited and eventually, published by Norman Cousins. At its height, it was influential as the base of several well-read critics (e.g., Wilder Hobson), and was often known under its initials as SR. Never hugely profitable, the magazine was able to survive the overall decline of the general-interest magazine category by several restructurings and attempts to reinvent itself but eventually succumbed to a declining market.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Saturday Review (US magazine)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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