Self-help (law)  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Self-help, in the sense of a legal doctrine, refers to individuals' implementation of their rights without resorting to legal writ or consultation of higher authority, as where a financial institution repossesses a car on which they hold both the title and a defaulted note. Individuals resort to self-help when they retrieve property found under the unauthorized control of another person, or simply abate nuisances (as by using sandbags and ditches to protect land from being flooded).

References

  • Bell, Tom W. 2003. "Free Speech, Strict Scrutiny, and Self-Help: How Technology Upgrades Constitutional Jurisprudence." Minnesota Law Review 87 (February).
  • Fischer, Julee C. 2000. "Policing the Self-Help Legal Market: Consumer Protection or Protection of the Legal Cartel?" Indiana Law Review 34 (winter).
  • Gerchick, Randy G. 1994. "No Easy Way Out: Making the Summary Eviction Process a Fairer and More Efficient Alternative to Landlord Self-Help." UCLA Law Review 41 (February).
  • Gitter, Henry. 1993. "Self-Help Remedies for Software Vendors." Santa Clara Computer and High Technology Law Journal 9 (November).





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Self-help (law)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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