Semeiotic  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Semeiotic is a spelling variant of a word used by Charles Sanders Peirce, likewise as "Semiotic," "Semiotics", and "Semeotic", to refer to his philosophical logic, which he cast as the study of signs, or semiotic. Some, not all, Peircean scholars have used "semeiotic" to refer to distinctly Peircean semiotic; and it is seldom if ever used in reference to semiotics more broadly. For more on Peirce's theory, see the first two links above. The remainder of this article is on the scholarly issue of the spelling of the word and on how that issue has become connected to the question of how strongly the Peircean semiotic theory should be distinguished from the rest of that which is currently called "semiotics".




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Semeiotic" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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