Shot-for-shot  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Shot-for-shot (or shot-for-shot remake) is a term used to describe a visual work that is transferred almost completely identical from the original work without much interpretations.

This term has been used widely recently in the film industry, when it produces films that are adapted from a comic/graphic novel origin. Each scene/cut from the movies is identical to the panel in the publication.

Contents

Production uses

In the film industry, most screenplays are transferred into a storyboard for visual representation. so that the crew would understand how it should be shot. However some directors have skipped this process and used the comic panels as storyboards (such as Robert Rodriguez)

Examples

From comics/graphic novels to film

Film to film

Some films are remade in an almost identical "frame-to-frame".

Animation to animation

Homage

Some directors pay tribute/homage to other works by including scenes that are identical.

Parodies

Many comedy works that relies heavily on parody uses shot-for-shot as a substance of humor.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Shot-for-shot" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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