Superficial charm  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Superficial charm, also called glibness, is used in popular psychology to describe a common manipulative technique using positive reinforcement. The "charm" is entirely insincere. It may manifest itself as flattery. It is an important attribute of psychopathic personalities. It is often used by abusers early on in an abusive relationship to attract and groom the abused person. High pressure salesmen or conmen also maliciously use superficial charm.

Less malicious forms of superficial charm manifest themselves as spin, the sales pattern used by salesmen, politicians, advertising and glossy brochures.

According to Hotchkiss, the fantasy world of narcissists can have a seductive allure. Their superficial charm can be enchanting, and they often appear complicated, colourful and exciting as they draw their victims into their narcissistic web.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Superficial charm" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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