Taxidermy  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Taxidermy (Greek for "the arrangement of the skin") is the art of mounting or reproducing animals for display (e.g. as hunting trophies) or study. This is a practice generally done with vertebrates, but occasionally with invertebrate animals such as insects. The methods that taxidermists practice have been improved over the last century, heightening taxidermic quality.

Taxidermists may practice professionally, for museums, or as amateurs, such as hunters. To practice taxidermy, one must be extremely familiar with anatomy, dissection, sculpture, and painting.

Modern Taxidermy

Nowadays taxidermy has been re-established as one of the more provocative forms of art. Used particularly by young female artists such as Polly Morgan and Alex Randall this modern form of taxidermy tends to be about inserting narrative, emotion and wit into everyday spaces.


In fiction

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Taxidermy" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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