Technicolor  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation. Technicolor was the most widely used color motion picture process in Hollywood from 1922 to 1952. It became known and celebrated for its hyper-realistic, saturated levels of color, and was used commonly for filming musicals (such as The Wizard of Oz and Singin' in the Rain), costume pictures (such as The Adventures of Robin Hood and Joan of Arc), and animated films (such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Fantasia). The adjective technicolored means in brilliant, often surreal colors.

The world instantly dissolved into a series of technicolored bubbles and, try as she might, Holly couldn't seem to hold on to more than one thought. 2001Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl, p 76

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Technicolor" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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